HOLISTIC MANAGEMENT

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In the last twenty years the term “holistic” has forcefully become part of the common language: holistic medicine, holistic massage, holistic food, holistic center, holistic operator, holistic vision and so on, up to a holistic company, holistic approach to Management. We can say that for a holistic approach to any one intends to take into account its entirety and the complex of its relationships, or the whole it is part of, otherwise it will be impossible to understand and deal with it correctly and effectively.

What does holistic mean? Where does it come from? The term holism, whose adjective holistic is holistic, goes back etymologically to the Greek holos which means “the whole, the totality, the wholeness”. So holistic means an approach, a theory, a therapy that takes into account not only a specific part, but the whole of the system. Holism is a theoretical vision that can be applied in physics, biology, chemistry, linguistics as well as in the social sciences and economics.

Holism is therefore a theoretical position (in the philosophical and scientific fields, as opposed to reductionism) according to which the properties of a system cannot be explained exclusively through its individual components, since the functional sum of the parts is always greater, or in any case different, of the same parts taken individually. Put more simply, the whole is greater than the sum of its parts.

An example of a holistic structure: the living being Holism is therefore a theoretical position (in the philosophical and scientific fields, as opposed to reductionism) according to which the properties of a system cannot be explained exclusively through its individual components, since the functional sum of the parts is always greater, or in any case different, of the same parts taken individually. Put more simply, the whole is greater than the sum of its parts.

A typical example of a holistic structure is the biological organism: a living being, as such, must always be considered as a complex unity-totality, which cannot be reduced to a simple assembly of its constituent parts. Unlike a machine, where the individual parts form and explain everything in a deterministic sense, it is only starting from a higher principle that it is possible to understand the development of its secondary aspects in the living organism. Holistic philosophy spreads in the West since the 1920s, and therefore looks at the living being as an example of an entity whose parts form a harmonious whole, inexpressible in a different way from how it is given.